Programs of Study

Course Offerings

From the School of Public Health Course Catalog

PH C102: Bacterial Pathogenesis (3 units)
Course Format: Three 1-hour lectures per week.
Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology 100 or 102 or consent of instructor.
Description: This course for upper division and graduate students will explore the molecular and cellular basis of microbial pathogenesis. The course will focus on model microbial systems which illustrate mechanisms of pathogenesis. Most of the emphasis will be on bacterial pathogens of mammals, but there will be some discussion of viral and protozoan pathogens. There will be an emphasis on experimental approaches. The course will also include some aspects of bacterial genetics and physiology, immune response to infection, and the cell biology of host-parasite interactions. Also listed as Molecular and Cell Biology C103 and Plant and Microbial Biology C103. (Sp) Portnoy

PH 162A: Public Health Microbiology (3 units)
Course Format: Two 1½-hour lectures per week.
Prerequisites: One year each of college-level biology and chemistry.
Description: Introduction to properties of microorganisms; their relationships with humans in causing infectious diseases and in maintaining health. May be taken without 162L. NOT OFFERED IN FALL 2017
(F) Buehring, (Su) Dailey, Elbeik

PH 162L: Public Health Microbiology Laboratory (1 unit)
Course Format: One 2-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: One year each of college-level biology and chemistry.
Description: Laboratory to accompany 162A.
(F) Loretz

PH 260A-260B: Principles of Infectious Diseases (4;4 units)
Course Format: 4 hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division course preparation in biology
Description: This course presents general principles of microbial interactions with humans that result in infection and disease. Common themes are developed using examples of viral, bacterial, and parasitological pathogens that exemplify mechanisms of infectious disease. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, host immune response, diagnosis, treatment, and control will be presented for each infectious disease discussed.
(F, Sp) PH 260A Riley & Swartzberg; PH 260B Swartzberg

PH 260C: Infectious Disease Laboratory (2,4 units). Lab training requirement is subject to change
Course Format: Two 7½-week modules, each with two 2-hour lectures and two 3-hour laboratories per week.
Prerequisites: PH 260A or consent of instructor. Students may take a single module for 2 units of credit.
Description: Module I: Practice in standard techniques for the isolation, identification, and characterization of infectious agents; laboratory safety. Module 2: Application of molecular methods to the identification and characterization of infectious agents, vectors, and hosts. (Sp) Sensabaugh, Loretz

PH 260E: Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases (2-3 units)
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and ½ hour of discussion per week. Offered in Fall even-numbered yr.
Prerequisites: PH 150A.
Description: The course will cover general principles and practical approaches in the use of molecular laboratory techniques to address infectious disease epidemiologic problems. It is designed for students with experience in the laboratory or in epidemiology, but not both. The principles to be discussed will include the use of molecular techniques in outbreak investigations, characterizations of dynamics of disease transmission, identifying vehicles, and quantifying attributable risks in sporadic infections, refining data stratification to assist case-control studies, distinguishing pathovars from non-pathogenic variants of organisms, doing surveillance, and identifying genetic determinants of disease transmissions. (F) Riley

PH 260F: Infectious Disease Research in Developing Countries (2 units). Offered in Spring odd-numbered yr.
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Description: The objective of this course is to provide M.P.H. and Ph.D. students with an appreciation and understanding of the complex issues involved in conducting scientific, laboratory-based investigation in developing countries. We will discuss the many obstacles to establishing and sustaining research projects, such as poor infrastructure, insufficient financial and material resources, and lack of scientific information and interaction. More importantly, we will identify innovative solutions to overcoming these obstacles. The first half of the course will consist of presentations by investigators in the U.S. and developing countries who have long-term research experience in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. We will also discuss related issues such as ethical considerations, equitable collaborations, and research capacity strengthening. During the second half of the course, students will give presentations on topics of their choice. Offered alternate years. (Sp) Harris

PH 262: Molecular and Cellular Basis of Bacterial Pathogenesis (Spring, 3 units)
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and 1 hour of literature review per week.
Prerequisites: PH 260A, PH 260B, or consent of instructor.
Description: This course for graduate students will explore the molecular and cellular basis of bacterial pathogenesis. The emphasis will be on model bacterial pathogens of mammals. The course also will include some aspects of bacterial genetics and physiology, immune response to infection, and the cell biology of host-parasite interactions. Public health courses 102 and 262 are taught concurrently. Students enrolled in Public Health 262 also will be required to attend a weekly discussion of the primary literature, both current and classic. Each student will be required to present one paper. (Sp) Portnoy

PH 263: Public Health Immunology (3 units)

Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: PH 260A (prior or concurrent). Graduate standing. Public Health major by consent of Instructor.

Description: This course will be the principal immunology course for students in the field of public health. It is designed to teach both the basic biology of the human immune system and its response in health and disease, especially the specific response of the human immune system to major human pathogens. Four areas will be explored: 1) components of the immune system (spectrum of cell types and cell products); 2) different arms of the immune system including humoral, cell-mediated, innate, and mucosal immunity; 3) specific immune response to infection caused by viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens; and 4) disorders of the immune system unrelated to infectious disease. Through this course, students should not only gain a basic understanding of the human immune system, but also learn the functions and responses of the human immune system to diseases of infectious and non-infectious nature, and the relevance of these interactions in the context of public health problems. (Sp) Stanley

PH 264: Current Issues in Infectious Diseases (2 units)
Course Format: One 1-hour lecture and one 1-hour discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 2nd year Infectious Diseases M.P.H. students only.
Description: Formerly PH 264A-264B. Examination of scientific, social, and policy dimensions of issues involving infectious diseases. Students select one topic for in-depth analysis and present findings in a public debate. Topics vary from year to year. (F) Fenyong Liu and Dailey

PH 265: Molecular Parasitology (3 units)
Course Format: Two 1½-hour lectures and 2 hours of discussion per week for 10 weeks, plus term paper. Offered in Fall odd-numbered yr.
Prerequisites: Upper division courses in molecular biology, parasitology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, or consent of instructor. Familiarity with reading primary research is recommended.
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced course in the molecular aspects of parasite immunology, molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, and genomics. The lectures will focus on state-of-the-art research in relation to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, parasite adaptations for survival within the host, and strategies for drug and vaccine development and disease control and prevention. Course content will rely heavily on current literature. (F) Harris

 

PH 266A: Foodborne Diseases (Fall, 2 units)
Course Format: 1½ hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of microbiology.
Description: This course will cover public health, microbiological, social, and economical issues related to foodborne diseases. Three areas will be explored: 1) categories, clinical manifestations, and disease processes of foodborne illness; 2) etiological agents causing foodborne illness; 3) investigation and prevention of foodborne illness. The course will discuss different types of foodborne diseases, clinical manifestations, and the interactions between etiological agents (pathogens and non-pathogens) and human hosts. We will cover pathogens that are the most frequently associated with foodborne illness, including bacterial and viral pathogens such as Salmonella, E. coli, hepatitis viruses and Norwalk-like gastroenteritis viruses. We will also study non-pathogen agents such as heavy metal, pesticide, and toxic chemicals. Furthermore, the course will discuss how to identify the etiological agents in outbreaks and possible measures that can be taken to minimize the risk to the public, including vaccines and education. Finally, we will explore the social and economic issues involved in the food production, distribution, and consumption that contribute to foodborne diseases.
(F) Lu

 

PH 266C Zoonotic Diseases

This is a graduate and professional level course designed to describe the major zoonoses and their life cycle, disease manifestations, epidemiology, and methods for prevention and control.  Available treatments, diagnostics, and public health and agriculture surveillance and “forecasting” programs will also be discussed.  The most recent research on the molecular and cellular basis of the mechanisms and consequences of the “species” jump from other animals to humans will be reviewed.

(Sp) Dailey

PH 275: Current Topics in Vaccinology (2 units)
Course Format: One 2-hour lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Principles of Infectious Disease (PH 260A); basic immunology course. Offered in Spring even-numbered yr.
Description: This is an advanced infectious disease course designed to cover issues related to the biological aspects of vaccinology. It will begin with discussions related to the concepts of correlates of protection, new understanding of cell-mediated and humoral immune response, and mucosal immunity. Then, topics related to the latest developments in recombinant vaccine technology, vaccine delivery systems, “naked DNA” vaccines, “designer” vaccines (“edible vaccines”), and the status of AIDS vaccine as a paradigm for new vaccine development will be covered. Each session will begin with a didactic lecture on topics outlined in the syllabus. This will be followed by a 10-15 minute discussion session based on published studies assigned for the week. Two students will lead the discussion at each session. A satisfactory letter grade or a passing grade will be based upon participation in class discussions, presentation, and a five-page paper. (Sp) Riley


PH 291A: Public Health Professional Development Series (1 unit)
Course Format: Two hours of workshop every week.
Description: A series of skills-based workshops designed to introduce the student to specialized skills needed in the public health workplace. These workshops are designed to complement the core curriculum of the School of Public Health and are selected based on regular feedback from faculty, public health practitioners, and students. Workshop facilitators include consultants, CPHP field supervisors, and public health practitioners with expertise in the subject. This course or series of workshops is open to all M.P.H. and Dr.Ph. students. Students select from a list of 2-hour workshops to total 1 unit equal to 15 hours of class time, plus readings that are assigned for many of the workshops. Workshop topics have included writing for publication, moderating focus groups, human resources management, legislative policy and advocacy, negotiation, evaluation, tools for financial planning, scientific grant writing, leadership, oral presentations, strategic planning, cultural competency, time management, and budgeting.
(F, Sp) Field Studies Program Staff

PH 291B: Public Health Internship Preparation Seminar (1 unit)
Course Format: Two hours of seminar every other week.
Description: Seminar providing area of concentration-specific preparation for M.P.H. internship. Emphasis on integrative activities with second-year students.
(F) Field Studies Program Staff

PH 292: Seminars for M.P.H. Students (1-4 units)
Course Format: One to four hours of seminar per week.
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Current topics and special issues in the health field.
(F, Sp) Staff

PH 293: Doctoral Seminar (1-4 units)
Course Format: One to four hours of seminar per week.
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Discussion and analysis of dissertation research projects, as well as of conceptual and methodological problems in planning and conducting health research.
(F, Sp) Staff

PH 295: Seminars (1-4 units)
Course Format: One to four hours of seminar per week.
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
(F, Sp) Staff

PH 296: Special Study (1-10 units)
Course Format: Independent study.
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Designed to permit any qualified graduate student to pursue special study under the direction of a faculty member.
(F, Sp, Su) Staff

PH 297: Field Study in Public Health (1-12 units)
Course Format: Field Study.
Grading Option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Supervised experience relevant to specific aspects of public health in off-campus organizations for graduate students. Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor and written reports required.
(F, Sp, Su) Staff

PH 298: Group Study (1-8 units)
Course Format: Independent study.
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
(F, Sp, Su) Staff

PH 299: Independent Research (1-12 units)
Credit Option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Independent study.
(F, Sp, Su) Staff

Eva Berkeley website picture

Professor Eva Harris in her lab